Freemasonry

Discussion in 'Et Cetera, Et Cetera' started by B_Stronzo, May 24, 2009.

  1. B_Stronzo

    B_Stronzo New Member

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    I am the first generation in my dad's family not to have joined The Freemasons since the 17th century.

    This morning I watched a pretty fascinating exposé on Freemasonry on PBS.

    Do we have Freemasons among our membership and if so are you aware of the pervasive view (by some religionists) that Freemasons are a cult or (worse still) devil worshippers?

    When my granduncle died in the late 1980s (he was ninety-three) his funeral service was conducted first by the Masons and no family members were allowed in until this 33rd degree Mason had been properly "sent off". When we did go in to see him lying in his coffin his face was surrounded by laurel leaves. I recall it seemed SO traditional and rooted in tradition.

    My dad in his fervent desire to see me become a Mason was inclined to taunt me about "the great secret" only Freemasons find out once joining.

    I'm curious as to the individual take on the world's oldest (no longer only fraternal) secret society.
     
    #1 B_Stronzo, May 24, 2009
    Last edited: May 24, 2009
  2. B_Think_Kink

    B_Think_Kink New Member

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    Sure why not, you only live once and you can probably leave the club if you don't like it.
     
  3. Skull Mason

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    I do it for free sometimes
     
  4. Drifterwood

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    I think that they prefer to be known as a Society with secrets, rather than a secret society. Still their history is very interesting. I personally won't be meeting anyone on the square.

    I don't think that they are as influential as they once were, during the early age of enlightenment for example. I'll have to return to you on their deism Stronzo.
     
  5. B_Stronzo

    B_Stronzo New Member

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    No. That's certainly true Drifterwood. The Age of Enlightenment was the height of power.

    Still. I find the entire phenomenon interesting especially in light of the adverse reaction of Roman Catholics to them. Very heartening! ;-)
     
  6. balior

    balior New Member

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    the "great secret" that you're referring to is only known to the highest degree masons (31-33)... other members gain knowledge increasingly as the move up in rank. if your family were high degree masons they should have the book "morals and dogma" which is only given to the 3 highest ranks; if you would like to know some the core beliefs to freemasonry i'd suggest asking you father if you could read it. i don't know if you can though because my understanding is that only high ranking members can see it.
     
  7. goodwood

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    Stronzo -
    what is your aversion to joining?
    i received a level 33 medalion from my grandmother, but she wouldn't tell me who it came from. it seems that someone in my family was a level 33 and gave it to her with instructions that she give it to me. i have lost it, but i fail to see how possessing a level 33 medalion would benfit me. i have been approached about joining and i simply have no interest. i am not clear on the benfits i would personally garner from joining this group.
     
  8. jakeatolla

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    To be quite honest, the real benefit of joining is to make business contacts. Think of it as just an earlier vesionof a social networking website. With a whoile lot of B.S. thrown in. :rolleyes:
     
  9. D_Bob_Crotchitch

    D_Bob_Crotchitch New Member

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    Oh. I have been reading too many of Skull Mason's posts. I thought this was about free bj's.
     
  10. lucky8

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    Just one of the sub-cults of the Illuminati bent on taking over the world, that's all. Skull and crossbones is where its at.

    Kappa Sig house at KU is one of the many free mason recruiting houses across the country. I know several people who are in it. Interestingly, they've all just graduated and each make a 6 figure salary, even though they really aren't all that intelligent
     
    #10 lucky8, May 26, 2009
    Last edited: May 26, 2009
  11. B_Stronzo

    B_Stronzo New Member

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    Sorry goodwood-

    I've just found this question now.

    I don't really have an aversion to joining. My brother (deceased) went through the DeMolay thing in preparation to join the Masons. He didn't live too long so he probably would have joined like our dad.

    The notion of fellowhip apd fairness (if indeed its all-inclusive) has great appeal to me. Since authoring this thread I've given it considerable thought again for the first time in a very long time. However I don't know where the Freemasons stand on homosexuality. I need to talk to two friends who're immensely invested in the organization and get a more modern take on the thing.

    Again - sorry to be so late answering your question. I just found it when I logged on this morning.

    The two hour documentary I watched said that was a common misconception. The Illuminati connection (acc. to the program) was invented by the Roman Catholic Church which forbids (since 1730) any involvement by their devotées in Freemasonry.

    Recall it's highest membership reached its pinnacle during the Age of Enlightenment. Anything Deist or largely inclusive religious organization has always frightened the Vatican in my view.
     
    #11 B_Stronzo, May 27, 2009
    Last edited: May 27, 2009
  12. Drifterwood

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  13. D_Chesty_Pecjiggle

    D_Chesty_Pecjiggle Account Disabled

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    It's my understanding that Freemasons can be any one so long as they believe in one god (e.g. Muslims could be Freemasons).

    The Catholics didn't like the idea of a group treating all single deities as equal. That's why the Catholics objected. It put them on the same order as Protestants, Muslims, and others.

    Freemasonry itself is not a religious order. But you have to accept a single god to be a Mason.

    But I agree with an earlier poster. I think it was an old form of social networking. That's not to say you shouldn't participate. I think its customs and such as you mentioned like your granduncles are moving. I love our melting pot culture. But I think that part of the loss (there are pros & cons to everything) is that we just don't have much custom in our culture that ties us to our past.
     
  14. B_Stronzo

    B_Stronzo New Member

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    Thanks boss ... (you sexy muff-loving bastard):cool: . I'll have a read and get back to you.

    A-fucking - MAZING!

    Thanks old friend. You've peaked my interest now.

    Had I one handy I'd offer you a muffin.
     
    #14 B_Stronzo, May 27, 2009
    Last edited: May 27, 2009
  15. B_Stronzo

    B_Stronzo New Member

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    A HUGE piece of me jeff believes that my major attraction to it is one based in just that very tradition (now fast-disappearing) that I recall from childhood. I nearly hear you when you write "we just don't have much custon in our culture that ties us to our past". It's a phrase that leapt from your post.

    We could start a separate thread with all the things that I considered irrevocable from my American past that were part and parcel of this New England culture that have now morphed into a version of themselves.

    Memorial Day (once Decoration Day), Fourth of July clambakes with all the ancient relatives, and a host of others come immediately to mind...

    I think in many ways I'm a sucker for tradition when that tradition is rooted in decency and real human connection. The aforementioned were for me during my childhood. And I miss them and those (now gone) who participated in - for instance - the Fourth of July clambakes - where some male relatives would get too blotto and randy and hit on the wrong spinster.

    Your post hit a fond place in my memory. Thanks.
     
  16. Drifterwood

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    Remember though - no interfering with other men's tools. :wink:
     
  17. B_Stronzo

    B_Stronzo New Member

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    I'm not guaranteeing NOTHIN' in that regard Englishman!

    I'd give that certain fellowship about 30 percent of my renewed interest in joining.
     
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