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Hurricane Irene

bimetaldude

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My thoughts are with those in the line of fire if she touches down as a major hurricane. a guy i am seeing lives in the miami area and i have friends and family throughout the southern florida region. i am hoping it does not get as bad as they say it could....:grouphug:
 

AlteredEgo

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Hello (Sud-Ouest, Burkina Faso)
It wasn't too bad when it hit Puerto Rico, but they say it is getting stronger. Those of us in SoFla are not likely to be directly hit, but it is still within the realm of possibility. Your focus is better spent hoping for the best for our friends further north in the Carolinas. They currently have the greatest chance of living where Irene makes her next landfall.

And for fuck's sake, my neighbors, if you live on the ground level east of I95, and have family encouraging you to stay with them for a few days on the second floor west of I95, pack your shit and go there Wednesday afternoon before the mandatory evacuations clog the streets. Don't be a complacent idiot like my otherwise brilliant sister in-law. Google the phrase "storm surge".
 

Horrible

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It makes me wish it was further south or in the Gulf, could have a lot of fun with the ensuing ground swells.
 

witch

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having loved ones in Florida, I hope they will be safe if this hurricane gets stronger and heads their way.
 

D_CountdeGrandePinja

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Here in south Florida and we are hoping and praying that Irene heads out to sea - far NE of US coastline.
 

PornForPatric

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My parents are currently on the north coast of the Dominican Republic and being hit by it. They said that the wind was pretty bad, but it hasn't rained much. Hopefully, it won't cause much damage.

I'm in Fort Lauderdale and just did the check on batteries, candles, water and canned goods. Charging the spare batteries for my phone and pulling in the plants just in case. I feel bad hoping it doesn't hit us since I know that means someone else will have to bear the winds and rain.
 

Bbucko

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I have a "plan A" which involves a couple (partners) who live on the barrier island stay with me if and when we get a major event. As I live in Wilton Manors in a concrete building, we'll be fine.

They have a generator which, in the aftermath, will be essential. Since these are genuinely close pals, it'll be a case of one hand washing the other. Bonus points: they have a pool, so there'll be no need for cold showers once the water's turned back on. UBb takes care of himself :cool:
 
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AlteredEgo

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Hello (Sud-Ouest, Burkina Faso)
My Plan A is to stay here, with my backpack packed. My Plan B is to stay with a relative in central Florida. She lives a little bit north of where my husband's job requires us to relocate in case of mandatory evacuation.
 

gymfresh

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My plan A is jetBlue on Wednesday to San Francisco. Well, that's been plan A since before Hurricane Irene formed. :smile:
 

nudeyorker

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I used to live in the Caribbean for a short time and survived Hurricane Hugo; it was one of the most frightening experiences of my life. Every time there is a warning I cross my fingers and say a little prayer for everyone in the line of fire.
 

BiItalianBro

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The re re re re re revised forecast is that it will skirt SoFla and the coast and slam NC and move up the Tidewater and Delmarva and along the eastern seaboard. Based on my experience with NE seaboard hurricanes...DC/Baltimore/Philly/NYC/New England will be a mess...even if it stays just off the coast. Best to all in the area...get ready to loose your power for a while. This weekend is gonna be fugly :/
 

Mem

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Looks like it's gonna miss south Florida, which is great because I am in the first evacuation zone. The second zone is anything east of Rt 1, Federal Hwy which is a little less than a mile from the ocean where I am. Luckily I had a friend offer me a place to stay in case of the storm hitting us, other than that the local High School is used as a shelter, but it is only a few blocks north of the second evacuation zone.
 

D_Adam_Baldwon

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Mother Nature apparently doesn't like the East Coast this week. Is anyone else following the path of Hurricane Irene? Forecasters say it could be very serious for those living along the coast from N.C. up through the New England area.
 

B_curiousme01

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My relative is a Floridian and lives near Miami. We just got off the phone and she said people are totally lax...calling up and asking if they should board their windows or get supplies! DUH!! Except your a day late in getting anything done!

They have hurricanes in one form or another every year. Only people fairly new to So. Florida call in to ask a stupid ass question like that. Anyone moving to Florida really should at least read about hurricane Andrew...I think that was the name of it. Totally levelled large sections of Miami Dade.

She's really wants to say "There's a f-ing category FOUR hurricane whose mass is five times the size of our state, 100s of miles strong and techincally only three hours away! The projected course can be up to 200 miles off! WTF do YOU think you should do now since you've obvioulsy done nothing to protect yourself? She's pretty frustrated, as you can tell.

Seriously now. I'm thinking our Northern brothers and sisters are woefully unprepared for most things related to the wrath of Mother Nature. Just watching the people during the newscast who panicked during the earthquake yesterday as they all got that clueless look and began running for the door all at the same time had my head shaking. It reminded me of the Great White fire disaster. Seems the outcome of that has been totally forgotten about.

Ya'll are kinda soft and naieve about natural disasters that don't include snowfall.
 

TomCat84

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The Weather Channel has it making a beeline for NYC and Boston. Eek! Send it over to Texas, they are having a drought, and I'm sure Horrible wouldn't mind the H2O...
 

TomCat84

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The re re re re re revised forecast is that it will skirt SoFla and the coast and slam NC and move up the Tidewater and Delmarva and along the eastern seaboard. Based on my experience with NE seaboard hurricanes...DC/Baltimore/Philly/NYC/New England will be a mess...even if it stays just off the coast. Best to all in the area...get ready to loose your power for a while. This weekend is gonna be fugly :/

Hell, if I lived in NYC or New England, my windows would be boarded up. I'd make a beeline for BevMo to stock up on booze. Then Id get drunk. Maybe have sex with the bf all day too :biggrin1:
 

bimetaldude

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i am going to miami in december and january cruising grand cayman islands and then miami again and the bahamas in november on another cruise
 

Horrible

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The Weather Channel has it making a beeline for NYC and Boston. Eek! Send it over to Texas, they are having a drought, and I'm sure Horrible wouldn't mind the H2O...

Bring it on.

It's getting ridiculous around here.
 
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Yeah i think its been a long time coming. Hope it isn't as bad as they say, pretty sure a lot will have no idea how to handle it. Seeing as how its been so long since we've encountered one. Hope there's like some plans for the elderly.
 

AlteredEgo

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Hello (Sud-Ouest, Burkina Faso)
My relative is a Floridian and lives near Miami. We just got off the phone and she said people are totally lax...calling up and asking if they should board their windows or get supplies! DUH!! Except your a day late in getting anything done!

They have hurricanes in one form or another every year. Only people fairly new to So. Florida call in to ask a stupid ass question like that. Anyone moving to Florida really should at least read about hurricane Andrew...I think that was the name of it. Totally levelled large sections of Miami Dade.

She's really wants to say "There's a f-ing category FOUR hurricane whose mass is five times the size of our state, 100s of miles strong and techincally only three hours away! The projected course can be up to 200 miles off! WTF do YOU think you should do now since you've obvioulsy done nothing to protect yourself? She's pretty frustrated, as you can tell.

Seriously now. I'm thinking our Northern brothers and sisters are woefully unprepared for most things related to the wrath of Mother Nature. Just watching the people during the newscast who panicked during the earthquake yesterday as they all got that clueless look and began running for the door all at the same time had my head shaking. It reminded me of the Great White fire disaster. Seems the outcome of that has been totally forgotten about.

Ya'll are kinda soft and naieve about natural disasters that don't include snowfall.
We do not have a hurricane every year. I have no idea what you are talking about. 2004 and 2005 were very active years. Before that, was Opal in 1995, and Andrew in 1992! I may have only moved down here a little over two years ago, but I have had family all over central Florida and the Gulf coast my whole life, so I have always watched weather alerts about major storms for Florida.

When I lived in NY, I distinctly remember a hurricane giving me a day off school one day late in September, but almost ruining my best friend's birthday slumber party. That Hurricane shared a name with my cousin Gloria. Many hurricanes and tropical storms end up having some affect on New Yorkers, frequently causing massive flooding, power outages, and deaths, just like anywhere else.

I have witnessed pure stupidity here in Florida. How is it that a native New Yorker like me knows that in case of emergency one should have (for example) one gallon of water per day per adult, while people from Haiti, Puerto Rico, Cuba and Florida have asked me if I thought 4-6 gallons of water was good enough storm prep for their entire household? How is it that having only been here long enough to see the weakest tropical storm ever, my first aid kit is far more thoughtful than those kits of people I have questioned?

My sister in law has been down here for seven years, and for five years before that in Puerto Rico. How did she prepare for the storm? She lives on the first floor, in evacuation zone one. She put gasoline in her car, bought a dozen cans of non-perishables, a propane tank (after I asked her to grab one for me) and 4 gallons of water. When questioned, she had no first aid supplies beyond cotton swabs, cotton pads (the kind you use to remove make up or apply toner) and band-aids. She did not get her prescriptions refilled, nor did she take out extra cash in case of power failure (which renders ATMs useless).

My husband lived in PR for only two years (maybe less) because he was in university in CO when his family returned to PR. We had been living in the Boston Metro Area for three years before coming down to Miami. We had three 5-gallon containers to fill with water, a first-aid kit with extra prescription medicine in case of long-term emergency, pain killers, anti-histamines, different kins of bandages and compresses, splints, an eyewash, an eye patch, sun screen and much more stuff (the first aid kit is almost an embarrassment of riches). We have camping gear ready and packed in case we have to evacuate, including a tent, sleeping bags, air pads, wet-start matches and a firestone, a hatchet an machete, a compass, you know, other camping stuff (lots!) and clothes that dry quickly. We had plenty of food, two bags of ice, extra pet food, a full tank of gas and a full gas can (also in case of emergency evac). We didn't buy any of this stuff this week either. It is storm season. We were prepared months ago. The only thing we did last-minute was take out a life insurance policy on my husband's sister. Her planning was piss poor, and in the event of her premature death, her parents would become liable for her student loans. We insured her to offset that for them. We may be a mid-westerner and a New Yorker, but we like to think we're practical.

My observation is that people in general, everywhere, fail to prepare adequately for storms. People who experience them frequently are either stupid or complacent; people who experience them infrequently are either stupid or ignorant. New Yorkers and New Englanders are not any more at a loss for what to do for a storm than people anywhere else. If you watch the local news there, you see images of people out in Queens and Long Island boarding up their windows. You see those same images, only the people are wearing heavy coats, when a nor'easter is expected. A storm is a storm.
 

monel

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I survived the earthquake of 2011. I think I can handle this. Think I'll head to the beach and await its arrival.

C'mon Irene. Do your worst!
 

exwhyzee

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Folks around the Chesapeake, eastern Pennsylvania, New Jersey, New York City area and New England are in for a big blow, and not the good kind. Lots of rain and very high winds. Gloria had winds up to 115mph on the eastern end of Long Island, but had minimal rain because it moved so fast. The wind for Irene could be more focused on NYC, and the storm is moving slower so rain totals could be higher. I understand the tidal cycle is high too, so coastal flooding could be worse than Gloria. Sunday will be an interesting day if the worst comes true. Be safe...we want to see you posting here next week!
 

elegant20

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I hope everyone would be alright once the storm is through.
 

BiItalianBro

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Hell, if I lived in NYC or New England, my windows would be boarded up. I'd make a beeline for BevMo to stock up on booze. Then Id get drunk. Maybe have sex with the bf all day too :biggrin1:

HAHAH...thats my kinda plan :biggrin1:

I am a bit concerned that my friends back in DC and NY are having a 'whatever' attitude about this. I dont want to be chicken little about this...but it concerns me. Apathy kills. My employer is setting up a plan to move assets (airplanes) out of DC,Philly,NYC/eastern NY state/Newark and all of N.E. and parking them in Cleveland, Pit, Chicago and Houston starting tonight.
 

Bbucko

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We do not have a hurricane every year. I have no idea what you are talking about. 2004 and 2005 were very active years. Before that, was Opal in 1995, and Andrew in 1992! I may have only moved down here a little over two years ago, but I have had family all over central Florida and the Gulf coast my whole life, so I have always watched weather alerts about major storms for Florida.

When I lived in NY, I distinctly remember a hurricane giving me a day off school one day late in September, but almost ruining my best friend's birthday slumber party. That Hurricane shared a name with my cousin Gloria. Many hurricanes and tropical storms end up having some affect on New Yorkers, frequently causing massive flooding, power outages, and deaths, just like anywhere else.

I have witnessed pure stupidity here in Florida. How is it that a native New Yorker like me knows that in case of emergency one should have (for example) one gallon of water per day per adult, while people from Haiti, Puerto Rico, Cuba and Florida have asked me if I thought 4-6 gallons of water was good enough storm prep for their entire household? How is it that having only been here long enough to see the weakest tropical storm ever, my first aid kit is far more thoughtful than those kits of people I have questioned?

My sister in law has been down here for seven years, and for five years before that in Puerto Rico. How did she prepare for the storm? She lives on the first floor, in evacuation zone one. She put gasoline in her car, bought a dozen cans of non-perishables, a propane tank (after I asked her to grab one for me) and 4 gallons of water. When questioned, she had no first aid supplies beyond cotton swabs, cotton pads (the kind you use to remove make up or apply toner) and band-aids. She did not get her prescriptions refilled, nor did she take out extra cash in case of power failure (which renders ATMs useless).

My husband lived in PR for only two years (maybe less) because he was in university in CO when his family returned to PR. We had been living in the Boston Metro Area for three years before coming down to Miami. We had three 5-gallon containers to fill with water, a first-aid kit with extra prescription medicine in case of long-term emergency, pain killers, anti-histamines, different kins of bandages and compresses, splints, an eyewash, an eye patch, sun screen and much more stuff (the first aid kit is almost an embarrassment of riches). We have camping gear ready and packed in case we have to evacuate, including a tent, sleeping bags, air pads, wet-start matches and a firestone, a hatchet an machete, a compass, you know, other camping stuff (lots!) and clothes that dry quickly. We had plenty of food, two bags of ice, extra pet food, a full tank of gas and a full gas can (also in case of emergency evac). We didn't buy any of this stuff this week either. It is storm season. We were prepared months ago. The only thing we did last-minute was take out a life insurance policy on my husband's sister. Her planning was piss poor, and in the event of her premature death, her parents would become liable for her student loans. We insured her to offset that for them. We may be a mid-westerner and a New Yorker, but we like to think we're practical.

My observation is that people in general, everywhere, fail to prepare adequately for storms. People who experience them frequently are either stupid or complacent; people who experience them infrequently are either stupid or ignorant. New Yorkers and New Englanders are not any more at a loss for what to do for a storm than people anywhere else. If you watch the local news there, you see images of people out in Queens and Long Island boarding up their windows. You see those same images, only the people are wearing heavy coats, when a nor'easter is expected. A storm is a storm.

Wow, AE: you continue to earn my acres of love for you <3

As a life-long New Englander turned now-permanent SoFla resident, I concur with you completely as regards storm preparedness. One of the reasons why I chose my Plan A friend as I did was because he grew up in Beverly, MA and would have everything ready and set should the worst happen.

Your memories of Gloria make me feel old, though. As it was just beginning to hit Boston, I was putting the final touches on preparing the furniture store I was managing in Park Square. As I walked uptown toward my apartment on Huntington Ave I passed the Hancock Tower and remembered its "glass problem": terrified, I raced for the presumed safety of the BPL before a slow crabwalk in stiff winds the rest of the way home and into the waiting arms of my impossible, beautiful South American lover. I was 25 :redface:
 

mista geechee

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Not too bad here. I live on the water and see pretty crazy summer storms come through here (slept through Hugo) , and in my community at least, we see the hurricane as a really big summer storm. Most of us ( people in their 20's ) go to the beach or just have a hurricane party. We rarely cancel school for them. I think Floyd was the last time. Got out of class today and the wind had more intensity than the rain but that only lasted for a shhort time. Here it's just an accepted fact of life.
 

The Dragon

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My thoughts are with my American friends as you batten down the hatches in the face of this huge hurricane as your thoughts and well wishes were with me when I faced Cyclone Yasi last season.

Stay safe warm and dry and please don't take silly risks.
 

darkbond007

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I live in the Bahamas and was here during the hurricane. It isnt nearly as bad as the media made it out to be. I've been through far worse. However our homes are built to withstand hurricanes.